Huntington's Disease

The NeuraMetrix monitoring tool allows neurologists to separate those who have the mutation with no visible symptoms into those where the disease is not yet active vs those where the disease has already begun
old woman in wheelchair receives medication from nurseold woman in wheelchair receives medication from nurse
Huntington’s disease (HD) is a 100% genetically determined disorder that causes the progressive breakdown of nerve cells in the brain. It deteriorates a person’s physical and mental abilities usually during their prime working years and has no cure. HD is known as the quintessential family disease because every child of a parent with HD has a 50/50 chance of inheriting the faulty gene.
 
The symptoms of HD are described as having ALS, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s – simultaneously. HD manifests as a triad of motor, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms which begin insidiously and progress over many years, until the death of the individual.
 
NeuraMetrix has just concluded a HD study with the world-leading authority on Huntington’s and a paper of the result is now being written. The results of this study are very encouraging as they indicate that the NeuraMetrix TC tool is able to separate those who have the mutation with no visible symptoms group into two distinct groups: one group where the disease is not yet active and one group where the disease has already begun.
 
With NeuraMetrix, the neurologist can: 
  • Monitor the effect of medication changes for an individual Huntington’s patient by accessing the patient’s chart a few weeks later and seeing if the changes had desired effect, no effect or, at worst, adverse effects – all enabling the neurologist to take corrective action, if necessary.

​​​​​​​Neurologists can give the patient access to the NeuraMetrix portal and let the patient:
  • Monitor themselves
NeuraMetrix is a member of:
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We train our Huntington’s patients intensively. I am amazed that the effects are so clearly shown in the inconsistency scores


​​​​​​​- Dr. Christina Lang, MD, Dept of Neurology, Rehabilitations- und Universitätskliniken Ulm