Parkinson's Disease

The NeuraMetrix monitoring tool allows neurologists to micromanage and individualize the treatment of patients with Parkinson’s Disease
old couple walking down bridge with young manold couple walking down bridge with young man

Parkinson’s disease requires micromanagement

Parkinson’s disease (PD) occurs when brain cells that make dopamine, a chemical that coordinates movement, stop working, or die. Because PD can cause tremor, slowness, stiffness, and walking and balance problems, it is called a “movement disorder.” But constipation, depression, memory problems, and other non-movement symptoms also can be part of Parkinson’s. PD is a lifelong and progressive disease, so symptoms slowly worsen over time.
 
With NeuraMetrix, the neurologist can:
  • Monitor the effect of medication changes (or other treatment change) for an individual PD patient by accessing the patient’s chart a few weeks after the change and determining if the changes had desired effect, no effect, or, at worst, adverse effects – all enabling the physician to take corrective action, if necessary.
  • Monitor the effect of other elements of disease management, such as diet and exercise for individual PD patient which can play a considerable role in reducing the progression of the disease and improving patients’ quality of life 
  • Manage PD patients who are struggling with on/off periods.

Neurologists can give the patient access to the NeuraMetrix portal and let the patient:
  • Monitor themselves
  • Assess the immediate effect of a treatment change including changing the timing of meds, as well as exercise and diet.

​​​​​​​The NeuraMetrix portal displays the subject’s inconsistency of typing cadence over time.
The chart below is an example of a Parkinson’s patient with well-optimized medication:
DASHBOARD: 55 YEAR OLD FEMALE WITH REGULATED PARKINSON'S
Inconsistency level is a calculation of the disease state – low level indicates less or no disease. Upwards trend means the disease is progressing. Higher fluctuations mean the disease is poorly regulated.
Chart of a Parkinson’s patient with well-optimized medicationChart of a Parkinson’s patient with well-optimized medication
The chart below is an example of a Parkinson’s patient without optimal medication, suffering from on/off periods:
DASHBOARD: 52 YEAR OLD MALE WITH UNREGULATED PARKINSON'S
Inconsistency level is a calculation of the disease state – low level indicates less or no disease. Upwards trend means the disease is progressing. Higher fluctuations mean the disease is poorly regulated.
Chart of a Parkinson’s patient without optimal medication, suffering from on/off periodsChart of a Parkinson’s patient without optimal medication, suffering from on/off periods
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I'm more than certain data from Neurametrix TC can't hurt and will ultimately be useful to myself, my doctor, and hopefully, patients in the future utilizing the program


​​​​​​​- John Smythe, Parkinson's Patient